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Model learns to pick out objects within an image, using spoken descriptions.

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Improved design may be used for exploring disaster zones and other dangerous or inaccessible environments.

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Algorithm computes “buffer zones” around autonomous vehicles and reassess them on the fly.

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Today’s autonomous vehicles require hand-labeled 3-D maps, but CSAIL’s MapLite system enables navigation with just GPS and sensors. MapLite uses perception sensors to plan a safe path, including LIDAR to determine the approximate location of the edges of the road.

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To suppress traffic instabilities known as phantom traffic jams, and using computer models, Horn and his team determined that drivers need to keep equal spacing with the cars in front of and behind them.

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We’ve all experienced “phantom traffic jams” that arise without any apparent cause. Researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) recently showed that we’d have fewer if we made one small change to how we drive: no more tailgating.

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By building computer systems that begin to approximate these capacities, the researchers believe they can help answer questions about what information-processing resources human beings use at what stages of development. Along the way, the researchers might also generate some insights useful for robotic vision systems.

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System for performing “tensor algebra” offers 100-fold speedups over previous software packages.

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Light lets us see the things that surround us, but what if we could also use it to see things hidden around corners? It sounds like science fiction, but that’s the idea behind a new algorithm out of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) — and its discovery has implications for everything from emergency response to self-driving cars.

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ComText, from the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, allows robots to understand contextual commands.

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Being able to both walk and take flight is typical in nature — many birds, insects, and other animals can do both. If we could program robots with similar versatility, it would open up many possibilities: Imagine machines that could fly into construction areas or disaster zones that aren’t near roads and then squeeze through tight spaces on the ground to transport objects or rescue people.

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GelSight technology lets robots gauge objects’ hardness and manipulate small tools.
 
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This week CSAIL Director Daniela Rus was presented with the Engelberger Robotics Award recipient for her instrumental work as a leader, educator, and pioneer in the field of robotics. The Robotic Industries Association (RIA) presented the award at Automate 2017 and the International Symposium on Robotics. Also receiving the honor this year is former MIT professor Gill Pratt, who now serves as CEO of the Toyota Research Institute.

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Palo Alto, Calif., Sept. 4, 2015 -- The research and development of intelligent vehicle and mobility technologies will get a major boost in an ambitious new collaboration between Toyota, Stanford and MIT.  At a press conference today, Toyota Motor Corporation (TMC) announced that it will be investing approximately $50 million over the next 5 years to establish joint research centers at each university.  Additionally Dr.

Seeking to reduce traffic casualties, center will focus on robotics and artificial intelligence systems.

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